Tag Archives: book tracking

Books I’ve Read No. 19 -fledgling¬†

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By Octavia E. Butler.

Loved it. I read it a little slower than most of the books that I really like. I think it is because I had not one clue what was going on at first, and some parts at the beginning are pretty disturbing! Once I understood that what I thought was horrible had a good reason for being, it was simply fascinating.

Even more fascinating is the author herself. Have a look at her Wiki page – she won so many awards and I’m sorry to see she has passed on. 

I’m sure I’ve read something of her work before, but never looked her up. This new experiment of mine, blogging about what I’ve read, is a welcome educational experience for me, too.

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Books I’ve Read No. 17 & 18 – autumn & autumn:the city

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Both by David Moody.

autumn, and autumn: the city are part of the author’s Autumn series: very loosely described as a post-apocalypse zombie series.

After reading Hater, I was excited to have a six book set to delve into. Sadly, I just don’t care for these books. I struggled through the first two, and gave up quite quickly into the third one.

It’s not the quality of his writing, not at all. It’s that I don’t care about the characters. They bore me. They keep dithering over making decisions over and over and over. No one is taking charge, and no one seems to really want to do anything to survive without whining about it for days until their choices are taken away from them by lack of action. Maybe that is the main point – but I don’t care for it. I kept thinking of ways to solve their problems much easier and faster! I don’t want to be the smartest person in a book. I want the characters to surprise me.

It doesn’t mean you won’t like the books – lots of people do! I’m not giving up on the author, as I’m still very curious as to what happens to the main character in Hater!


Books I’ve Read No. 12 – Predator

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By Patricia Cornwell

Turns out I’ve read this before, but with such a generic name and by such a prolific author, I didn’t realise it at first. I’ve read most of this series, but never in chronological order. It doesn’t matter, which can be a good thing.

This is one from the free library at work.

I do like the Scarpetta books, but this seems to be overly loaded with personal conflicts between the main characters, and no good reason for it. Sure, there is a reason, but these people have to have some terrible communication skills to let the misunderstandings get so far. In any case, the main story, as always, is a good read. I just don’t like the main people very much in this book. Thankfully, they mellow out later.

Books I’ve Read 2017 #9 – What’s it Like in Space?

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By Ariel Waldman.

This is a fun, short book with illustrations and one-page anecdotes of the things that happen, things that you can do, things that you can’t do, and what things are wonderful or horrible about being in space.

I really enjoyed it – I’ll never get to space (as much as I’d like to), so learning about what I’m missing is fun and educational. Definitely safe for kids – yes, there is talk of “elimination” but what kid doesn’t already want to know the answers to those questions? Or people like me who might physically be a woman in her mid-forties but has the scatalogical humour of a 9-year-old-boy?


And that is me finally done for January. We won’t count the 3 national geographic magazines or four gardening magazines, right? Can’t review them. Or can I?

Books I’ve Read #8 – Unhappenings

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Um, actually this was no. 7. I forgot about it! That doesn’t sound good, but it was only due to my needing a few days to write the post about Lumi. I kept getting interrupted!

Unhappenings is by Edward Aubry. A very easy read, well written and caught my interest from the start – what is happening, or unhappening, to the main character, and why? Genres are science fiction and time travel, so if either of those interest you, have a go. He does pretty well with human motivations, too.


Absolutely stunning cover art, too.

Books I’ve Read #7 – Offspring¬†

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Yeah, more Jack Ketchum. Offspring is a continuation of Off Season. I have to admit I’m getting kind of bored with him now. Too many at once, perhaps? His writing is great; that’s not the problem. I think that I’m getting used to the same type of story and the horror becomes predictable. I know what to expect now.

He also writes about nipples way too often. Describes them too often, also. Seriously, he seems to think we women are mainly concerned with our nips being injured. Maybe some women do but for me it gets old fast. Guess Jack is a boob man? Anyhoo, here is the cover:


…which I apparently never looked at properly. A movie? Have I seen it? No, looking at the official trailer, I have not. But it appears as though it keeps very close to the book. 

Books I’ve Read #4 – Into Thin Air

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By Jon Krakauer.

This is a rare departure for me – nonfiction! If the author sounds familiar, he also wrote Into the Wild (which I read a few years back).

The fun part of my being able to read this book is that the company I work for has a lending library in the building. Anyone can contribute, borrow or even keep the books left in. I pick one out and read during my lunch hour until it is done, and pick another one. This one I might keep to give to a good friend who is a mountain climber himself.

What a great idea, and I take full advantage of it!

Books I’ve read #3 – The Ice Beneath Her

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By Camilla Grebe. I read the English translation.

Clearly this was translated by an English English person, because an American English translator wouldn’t use ‘knickers’ for underwear. If you don’t mind that little bit of jarring language difference (I sure don’t), it’s a good book. Psychologically, very interesting. Recommended!