Supermoon

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I can’t take credit for these. While I was outside with him, it was iDJ manning the camera on its War of the Worlds tripod. We went down along the side of our neighbour’s house, on the right of way between more (empty since built) houses and a cow pasture (also empty – I think it is going to be used for silage this year).

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There was a lot of learning about the camera done that night. I love this photo.

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But eventually the cloud cover cleared, and he got ‘the shot.’

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It’s funny, but I’ve never been able to see ‘the man in the moon.’ There just is not a face up there for me. It’s only craters and mares. I guess I won’t be seeing Jesus in my toast anytime soon.

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13 responses »

  1. Those first 2 pictures are magical – really amazing.
    I never saw the face either…but if you kinda squint at the 3rd picture – there on the right there’s sort of a smilie face …or a demented snowman face….
    Not going to risk the toast – unless we can sell it on ebay…need vacation money…

  2. Oh those are brilliant! I could only capture a little of the effect with my point and shoot. And I never saw the “man” either; one of my relatives said she saw a bear.

  3. It’s definitely not easy to shoot the moon. Was that with your 1-billion-settings camera? I know I tried at a few occasions to shoot the moon with my camera, and all I can really get is an abstract blurred source of white light. Aillurous had a few good shot on her blog once, and I remember we discussed this problem of shooting the moon at that time.

    I don’t see a face neither. I am more logical and scientific than fantasy and dreams. I don’t see a face, I see Coppernicus crater along the… alright I don’t know the names of the places on the moon, I only remember the Coppernicus crater is almost exactly in the middle because that is were Tintin went in the famous book (famous to French people anyway, I’m not sure how known that is for the rest of you, who were born with the language I had to learn). All I really know is it’s one of the reason life is possible, why we exist.

    You might already know this but… The full moon is not the best moment to observe it. Many will even tell you it’s the worst moment. The full moon means the sun is directly in front of it, and therefore there is absolutely no shadow on the moon during a full moon. You won’t get to see craters or textures. Just a flat white circle. I like to watch the moon about 4-5 days before of after the full moon, when there is still a large area to watch, and craters and textures become visible.

    Pick binoculars or a telescope, it’s so amazing to observe that small “planet”. I have access to neither right now, but I can’t count how many hours I have spent watching it as a kid. I knew exactly the best days.

    I never knew the name of it or what did it. But watch approximately in the middle of the lower left quadrant. There is a very large crater. It’s visible to the naked eye if you really try hard to, but it’s even better with binoculars. It’s gigantic. We wouldn’t exist if whatever struck the moon there back then had struck us instead.

    • I can see that massive crater and the lines of damage radiating out in the one shot he took! You have a great point about the sun, and I’ll be sure to pass that on to our intrepid photographer. I prefer to try to capture what I see – which is quite hard sometimes. I can focus on a bright colour and the shot? gives me much less that that. Which is why it is interesting that hubby says I’m better at black and white photography than he is.

  4. Gorgeous. I’d love me some Gorgonzola. I finally saw the supermoon by accident that night. I had looked for it earlier, but couldn’t find it. At 2:00 am, it’s brilliant light came streaming through my bedroom window. I do love these night sky phenomena.

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